Authors Supporting Authors: Q&A With Christine Carbo

2015 Haven Retreats:
September 9-13 (FILLING FAST)
September 23-27 (FILLING FAST)
October 7-11
October 21-25

11390215_10152771872081266_5713115019216739589_nIn my travels as a published author, I have found that writers who are writing are generous and kind to one another. Along the way they have given me face-to-face and long phone-calls-full of sage advice (Lee Woodruff, Dani Shapiro, Arielle Ford, Julie Metz, and so many others, they have shown up at my readings even when they were maxed out and busy, (Beth Hoffman), given me sensible gifts for the sustainable self like nesting pouches for key items (a signing pen, power point thumb drive, Advil, and reading glasses, because that’s how long it takes most of us to get published, (Pricilla Warner), agreed to meet me on the stage and ask mutual powerful questions in public with a naked heart in their hands (Kelly Corrigan, Jennifer Weigel), social media support in Tweets, Facebook posts, etc. (Nigella Lawson, Giada de Laurentiis, Patty Chang Anker, Sukey Forbes), and radio love (Dr. Christiane Northrup, Shelia Hamilton).

With Lee Woodruff at book signing.

With Lee Woodruff at book signing.

We all just say the same thing in our own way: pass it on. So when local author, Christine Carbo landed a two book deal with Simon and Schuster, not only did I run to her book party even though I was drinking from the firehose getting ready for my second June Haven Retreat, but I asked her if I could shine a light on her new book (and her writing process) on my blog. Writers must support each other. No matter what you care about deeply, I hope that you will be generous and kind, and take heart in the power of passing it on.  I hope this will inspire you!  yrs. Laura

Christine Carbo, debut crime-fiction author of THE WILD INSIDE, a gripping crime novel about the perilous, unforgiving intersection between man and nature, shares some thoughts about writing her first crime-fiction novel and the wild area that fuels her writing.

1) As a debut author, what has been the most exciting thing for you when it came to breaking into the traditional world of publishing?

Like many artists, I felt very vulnerable to put my work out to the world, and I always sensed that if and when I was signed on, that it would be the boost of confidence that would be most important and exciting for me. It turns out that that is true to a large degree, and in fact, I was over the moon when my agent was selling The Wild Inside because I had offers from two major publishers, which was more than I ever imagined. But ultimately, as cliché as this may sound, the most exciting thing for me has been getting that first real reader – the reader not needed for edits or feedback or reviews, the reader who simply writes a letter to you because they feel inspired to do so. Mine came from someone who received one of my galleys in a random galley give-away. She loved the story and wrote that she thought The Wild Inside had a poignancy like a movie she had been fond of for long time, in which a young man drowned, and because of that, a whole world of tragedy unfolded. She pointed out that sometimes all it takes is one human event to reverberate outward and affect many lives. The satisfaction and excitement to finally have that first real reader provide unsolicited comments was well worth all the hardships an aspiring author goes through to get that first work out there!

2) Living near a stunning national park and surrounded by the beauty and splendor of the location, as well as residing in the tight-knit communities of Montana, is the rural setting ideal for your characters? Do you find it more exciting than the big city life?

I don’t necessary find it more exciting than big city life. In fact, when I originally set out to write a crime thriller, I was concerned that when it came to “writing what you know,” I didn’t live in a dynamic, bustling, sexy city that exposed me to enough interesting criminal elements to pull off crime fiction. But, when I really began to pay attention to the area I live in and love, I began to see that it was full of interesting contrasts in terms of economic and environmental issues. And as far as crime goes, well there’s plenty of that no matter where you go, and my neck of the woods has no shortage. And don’t get me started on the number of serial killers in the Northwest!

And yes, the rural setting in The Wild Inside turned out to be an excellent match for my characters in many ways. Not only was I able to use the natural conflict of surrounding communities plagued by unemployment and sometimes drugs, and of small towns nestled against great patches of wilderness and all the wonders and dangers the wilderness has to offer, I was able to write about the place I love the most: the evocative and commanding Glacier Park. When I began to think of Glacier in terms of its haunting nature, I found it to be very dramatic and highly atmospheric. It became a living, breathing character for me, and in my protagonist’s mind (given the history of losing his father to a grizzly attack while camping there when he was young), the park itself became his antagonist. In some ways, Glacier Park – glorious and savage – is the “star” character of the book.

3) Your novel takes a look at nature’s wilder or darker side. When you’re in the great outdoors in Montana, how often do you feel the threat of the wild?

Northwest Montana’s nature can be quite imposing—not so much because it feels like a daily threat, but because its presence has a strong force or pull. In the Flathead Valley where I live, it is not uncommon to see elk, moose, coyote, bear, fox, and other wildlife just minutes from town. Or, you can be running an errand, your mind on all the things you need to get done and skip a breath because the evening light hitting the surrounding mountains is so inspiring. The natural world surrounds us and tugs at us. And it’s quite special to be constantly reminded of it—to be yanked away from the daily routine of work and errands – even our solipsism – to stop short because the scenery competes for our attention or because a herd of elk passes through the back yard. But we get used to the wild, so it doesn’t feel like a threat, yet there is a respect we have for it. Most of us consider risk-management in some way, not unlike those who live and play near the ocean and are careful about the tides and certain marine life. I carry capsaicin bear spray often, depending on where I choose to walk the dog or to go hiking, and sometimes just taking the trash out before it gets light out makes you wonder what lurks in the bushes beside the driveway. Neighbors frequently lose their cats to anything from owls, eagles, or mountain lions; and pet dogs are sometimes taken by lions and even wolves every so often. We had a black bear in our backyard just two weeks ago. When I walk the dog and see mountain lion or bear tracks on the trail or a pile of bear scat, it definitely carries some weight, some wonder. It reminds me of our mortality and that the untamed parts of our world do present a certain system that many of us—safe in our cities, homes and cars—have been able to disconnect from to a degree. This wonder helps fuel my writing

4) How do conflicts and such wonders show up in THE WILD INSIDE?

In THE WILD INSIDE, some of the conflicts revolve around characters in communities lying just outside Glacier National Park. Glacier draws over a million people (more than Montana’s population) each summer and most of these visitors drive through a canyon where the Middle and South Forks of the Flathead River cut through. The towns in this canyon rely on the onslaught of tourists for a short-lived season, but they are also poverty stricken places with few job opportunities. Heavy drinking and drug use, especially meth, are problems. In my main character’s investigation, he faces the life-styles the locals face as well as the kinds of conflicts that arise in Glacier Park, both intra-agency issues as well as ones that arise from trying to manage nature in order to keep it wild, yet accessible to millions of tourists.

And wonders? Well, they abound in the wilderness, and I feel fortunate to have the opportunity to show some of the natural world without sounding preachy. If I can simply release some of the wild in a reader’s mind, let them slide to the side of politics and statistics read in daily papers or journals for a moment, then I am thrilled. In THE WILD INSIDE, I am able to write about the majestic grizzly bear to a small degree – hopefully let its heart beat on the page, and it thrills me to let that animal loose from its cage of statistics, at least in one’s mind. If I can do that with bits and pieces of our natural world, then I feel I have perhaps unwittingly become a servant of Mother Nature, and I love that feeling.

For your main character, how do the tensions in the wild stack up against the human ones?

For Ted Systead, an investigator from the Department of the Interior, who gets called to Glacier to investigate a crime where a man is found dead and bound to a tree, the tensions presented by the wild stack up in his mind much more intensely and ominously. Glacier is the last place Ted wants to work because when he was fourteen, he witnessed his father get mauled and killed by a grizzly while camping there one night. In many ways, the dynamics of being in Glacier, among its wild elements, proves to be much more haunting than some of the disturbing, ruthless, but common human crimes in the local towns outside the park.

5) What comes next? Are you already “deep” into the next novel?

I have already written and turned in the second novel to my editor and will soon be in the process of revising it while simultaneously doing events for The Wild Inside and beginning work on a third novel. The second book will also feature Glacier National Park, and calm and methodical Monty, Ted’s assisting Park Police Officer in The Wild Inside, will lead the next investigation in the beautiful, lush Glacier Park during the summer months when it is in full swing. In some ways, readers will feel like it is a series, since Glacier – practically its own character – continues on, even though both novels can stand alone.

Thank you for interviewing me, Laura!

 

Christine_Carbo-3Christine Carbo grew up in Gainesville, Florida until she moved to Montana when she was twelve. After earning a pilot’s license, pursuing various adventures in Norway, and a brief stint as a flight attendant, she got an MA in English and Linguistics and taught at a community college. She still teaches in a vastly different realm as the owner of a Pilates studio. She lives in Montana with her husband, three kids, one incredibly silly dog and one self-possessed cat.

www.christinecarbo.com
Twitter: @christine_carbo
FB: Christine Carbo, Author
“Evocative debut…Carbo paints a moving picture of complex, flawed people fighting to make their way in a wilderness where little is black and white, except the smoky chiaroscuro of the sweeping Montana sky.”-Publishers Weekly

1 Comment

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One Response to Authors Supporting Authors: Q&A With Christine Carbo

  1. Bravo to writers supporting writers! Hope to catch up with you again before long, Laura. Love this interview and can’t wait to check out Christine’s work. xox

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